Things Are A Moving!

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Follow me to my new website and my journey from screenplay to screen!  AFTERMATH was completed this spring and went through revisions this summer, thanks to the notes from two producers. Gratefully, it has now found representation and soon a home.

Go to my NEW website where I continue my journey toward finding my Path in this life, sharing all the bumps and bruises on the way.

Leap and the Net Will Appear: Part II

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10,000 miles in seven weeks has brought me to my new life.  Leaving our 3,700 square foot home to our new 45 foot boat in Florida brings many unexpected challenges and joy.  Giving up the safety-net job of teaching was the first step, then it was putting all of my life into the back of my Dodge Avenger.  (That’s when I realized that everything in my life was truly temporary!) I also realized that picking and choosing items to keep in life and those to let go of can be emotional, yet freeing. 

Things to Keep

memories-last-foreverSome things were easy to keep.  The things that make life a little easier, as well as things that brought me joy.  It was the memories of friends I had made in the past 25 years living in Nevada. They were there for me for a reason or a season, though only a few were for longer. The memories of those that made me laugh or listened to my sorrows will always hold a special place in my heart. The memories of having groups of friends where monthly get-togethers were fun diversions, to watching their children grow making us feel a little older and wiser.  Also, the beauty of Lake Tahoe and the places that brought me happiness.  I often visit those places in my mind when I need a pick me up.

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 It Took Alaska…

I don’t regret going to Alaska.  It taught me so much about my intuition and those that suffer from mental illness. I feel this journey only made me a better writer exploring the human experience.

Signs Like a Totem Pole

The plane landed in Anchorage without delay.  I wasn’t sure what to expect from my first views of Alaska after researching it for the past five months.  Green, lush pine groves, tall snow laden mountains and large blue skies would be the backdrop to my first feature film.

Krystal had already grabbed her backpack and was bubbling over with anticipation and a little apprehension.  Would this be the same Alaska she knew 25 years ago?  I was to write her life story, a feature film about the events that led her back to the man who broke her heart so many years ago and the woman she had now become.

It was a story of survival and redemption.  I was excited that this movie could launch her career as a Life Coach.  Little did I know that this trip would be a shocking discovery of broken dreams, harsh realities and a tattered soul.

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Saving Our Students, Saving Our Schools, Part 2: Could Semantics Kill A Proven Program?

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When I started teaching mindfulness based stress reduction with my 3rd graders, I worried there would be push-back from my parents thinking I would be teaching meditation, although the word was not used in the curriculum.

However, within the first week of practice, students would use the word meditation from their own background knowledge of the word.

Students practicing breathing techniques.

Students practicing breathing techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

Knowing this could be cause for concern, I briefly taught the students the difference between practicing breathing techniques to calm the brain and Meditation. Since then, in the nine years of teaching Mindfulness, I’ve only had one incident where a parent discontinued their child in the activities, due to religious choice.

The program I implemented was called The MindUp Curriculum by the Hawn Foundation.  I chose this program, because it is non-secular in its teaching of mindfulness using brain-based research in the 15 activities.

Students were taught in the first three lessons how their body responds to stress and how to regulate the stress through mindful breathing techniques called Core Practice.  For the rest of the twelve lessons in the program, the students learned how to be Mindful, practice Empathy, and to self regulate during stressful or excitable situations.

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Saving our Students, Saving our Schools- Part 1

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“When the student is ready the teacher will appear.” ~ Buddha

I had the privilege this year to teach over 175 eighth graders the art of mindfulness once a week for over 10 weeks.  It was  a profound experience for them and completely eye-opening for me.  Although I had taught hundreds of elementary aged children mindfulness, I did not realize how desperate our teenagers were for this practice in their life.

It wasn’t instant buy-in at first.mindfulness

I recall the first time the students walked into their Science class that Friday to see me sitting at the side of the room.  They immediately went into ‘substitute teacher’ mode. I smiled and walked to the front of the room and stood quietly, ignoring their comments and rambunctiousness.  I had forewarned their Science teacher, sitting in the back of the room, to let them just be themselves and not correct their behavior.  She was visibly nervous.

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